Paphos Hamam

Paphos Hamam

Part of a larger complex built during the medieval period, the bath’s heating technology closely follows its Byzantine and Roman prototypes.

The Chrysopolitissa bath was part of a larger complex built during the medieval period and modified in later times. It consists of two domed rooms and two smaller rooms with a barrel vault roof placed on the long sides of a narrow entrance hall. The heating technology of the bath closely follows its Byzantine and Roman prototypes, employing a floor-heating system (hypocaust).

Mediaeval and ottoman baths have their origins in the Roman and Byzantine Periods. They combine the functionality and architectural features from the Roman thermae and the Byzantine baths with the Arab and Ottoman tradition of steam bathing. Like their Roman predecessors, they consist of adjacent cold, warm and hot rooms.

When the hamam was functioning, fire was lit in a furnace located in the back of the building block. It directly heated the water of the bronze and indirectly heated the bath’s floor, which was supported on low pillars. Hot gasses and smoke circulated under the floors before they were drawn out by the flues embedded in the thick walls. The hot room was placed closest to the furnace. Clay pipes distributed hot water from the boiler to the hot room.

On the walls are visible the traces of the water faucets, under which small basins used to be placed. During bathing, water splashing on the warm stone slabs of the floor evaporated, creating a steam bath. The bathing rooms have no windows. They are lit by perforations οn the domes and the vaulted roofs, which used to be closed with thick round glass.

Mediaeval and ottoman baths have their origins in the Roman and Byzantine Periods. They combine the functionality and architectural features from the Roman thermae and the Byzantine baths with the Arab and Ottoman tradition of steam bathing. Like their Roman predecessors, they consist of adjacent cold, warm and hot rooms.

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